Sunday Meditation – Pardon of Sin

Sunday Meditation – Pardon of Sin

“No man must thank sin, or blame God for sin, even though he extracted the antidote out of this viper. Since the Lord demonstrates his glory in overruling and pardoning sin, to the salvation of poor sinners, there is good reason to magnify him to the highest. Since we have dishonored God very much by our sin, it is important that we now adore him for his grace. . . . Thankfulness is pleasing to God, not only in good days, but in bad. This is the best sacrifice and gift we can offer to God. Mr. Bradford, a martyr, speaking of Queen Mary, at whose mercy he lay said, ‘If she releases, imprisons, or burns me, I will thank her. Let God do with me as he wills, I will be thankful.'”

William Cooper

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Sunday Meditation – Thankfulness

Sunday Meditation – Thankfulness

“The Spirit of God teaches the souls of believers this lesson of thankfulness. David’s heart was tuned to the praises of God, and it is important that thankfulness is encouraged and practiced under the gospel also. Thanksgiving demonstrates a spiritual and noble frame of the soul in the highest pitch of grace. The Lord Jesus taught us thankfulness both by pattern and precept, and He thanked God frequently and fervently. Even when He was to eat common bread, He gave thanks (Mark 8:6). The nine lepers were reproved for their unthankfulness (Luke 17:17-18). Thankfulness is the worship we owe God for all that we have and are (1 Cor 15:10). We live precariously, and are always at God’s mercy. God in His sovereignty might have never made us; or, He could have crushed us into nothing as soon as we were made, for, ‘has the potter no right over the clay?’ (Rom 9:21). Every moment we depend upon Him, and all we have are gifts from Him (Acts 17:25). His power over us is absolute and infinite. To this Sovereign we owe all, and therefore we owe Him our thanks. ‘For from him and through him and to him are all things. To him be glory forever. Amen’ (Rom 11:36).”

William Cooper

Sunday Meditation – Treasure in Heaven

Sunday Meditation – Treasure in Heaven

It is true, I want nothing here on earth; but still I feel that to die would be gain to me, even though I left all these. He holds earth loosely; he does not grasp it with a tight hand, but looks upon it all as dust, — a thing which is to pass away. He takes but little pleasure therein, saying,

“I’ve no abiding city here, I seek a city out of sight.”

Mark that man; he has plenty of room for pleasures in this world, but he drinks out of a higher cistern. His pleasure springs from things unseen; his happiest moments are when he can shut all these good things out, and when he can come to God as a poor guilty sinner, and come to Christ and enter into fellowship with him, and rise into nearness of access and confidence, and boldly approach to the throne of the heavenly grace. Now, what is it that keeps a man who has all these mercies from setting his heart upon the earth? This is a wonder, indeed, that a man who has gold and silver, and flocks and herds, should not make these his god, but that he should still say,

“There’s nothing round this spacious earth, That suits my large desire; To boundless joy and solid mirth, My nobler thoughts aspire.”

These are not my treasure; my treasure is in heaven, and in heaven only. What can do this? No mere moral virtue. No doctrine of the Stoic ever brought a man to such a pass as that. No, it must be the work of the Spirit, and the work of the Spirit alone, that can lead a man to live in heaven, while there is a temptation to him to live on earth. I do not wonder that a poor man looks forward to heaven; he has nothing to look upon on earth. When there is a thorn in the nest, I do not wonder that the lark flies up, for there is no rest for him below.

Charles Spurgeon

Sunday Meditation – Our Advocate

Sunday Meditation – Our Advocate

“Have you seen your state to be desperate if the Lord Jesus does not undertake to plead your cause? Jesus is not entertained, as long as men can make shift without Him. Have you entertained Him like this? — ‘I will perish forever if the Lord does not step in; Lord Jesus, undertake for me!’ Are you deeply concerned about the greatness of the damage that will certainly overtake you forever, if you are accused before God without Him? Have you told Him what is the matter and how things stand? He desires to hear them from your own mouth ‘O’, says the soul, ‘Lord, I have come to you upon an earnest business! I am arrested by Satan, my conscience convicts me, and I will be accused before the judgment seat of God. . . . Lord, I am distressed, undertake for me!’ O consider your advocate a friend, and not an enemy! You must open your heart to Him and reveal your whole cause unto Him.”

John Bunyan

Sunday Meditation – God is Love

Sunday Meditation – God is Love

“You could not make your child show forth love to you if its little heart was full of fear; if it dreaded to hear your footstep, and was alarmed at the sound of your voice, it could not love you. You might obey some huge ogre because you were afraid of him, but to love him would be impossible. It is one of the master-pieces of Satan to deceive man by presenting to his mind a hateful picture of God. He knows that men cannot love that which terrifies them, and therefore he paints the God of grace as a hard, unforgiving being who will not receive the penitent and have pity upon the sorrowful. God is love! Surely if men had but grace enough to see the beauty of that portrait of God – that miniature sketched with a single line, ‘God is love!’ they would willingly serve such a God. When the Holy Ghost enables the mind to perceive the character of God, the heart cannot refuse to love him. Base, fallen, depraved as men are, when they are illuminated from on high so as to judge rightly of God, their hearts melt under the genial beams of divine love, and they love God because he has first loved them. But here is the master-piece of Satan, that he will not let the understanding perceive the excellence of God’s character, and then the heart cannot love that which the understanding does not perceive to be loveable.”

Charles Spurgeon

Sunday Meditation – The Gardener’s Rose

Sunday Meditation – The Gardener’s Rose

I remember at a funeral of a friend hearing a pretty parable which I have told before, and will tell again. There was much weeping on account of the loss of a loved one, and the minister put it thus. He said, “Suppose you are a gardener employed by another; it is not your garden, but you are called upon to tend it, and you have your wages paid to you. You have taken great care with a certain number of roses; you have trained them up, and there they are, blooming in their beauty. You pride yourself in them. You come one morning into the garden, and you find that the best rose has been taken away. You are angry: you go to your fellow servants and accuse them with having taken the rose. They will declare that they had nothing at all to do with it; and one says, ‘I saw the master walking here this morning; I think he took it.’” Is the gardener angry then? No, at once he says, “I am happy that my rose should been so fair as to attract the attention of the master. It is his own: he has taken it, let him do what seems good to him.”

It is even so with your friends. They wither not by chance; the grave is not filled by accident; men die according to God’s will. Your child is gone, but the Master took him; your husband is gone, your wife is buried—the Master took them; thank him that he let you have the pleasure of caring for them and tending them while they were here, and thank him that as he gave, he himself has taken away. If others had done it, you would have had reason to be angry; but the Lord has done it. Can you, then, murmur? Will you not say—

You at all times will I bless
Having you I all possess
How can I bereaved be
Since I cannot part with thee

Charles Spurgeon

Sunday Meditation – Christ our Advocate

Sunday Meditation – Christ our Advocate

“Christ pleads as an advocate for his people. He pleads the very weaknesses for which Satan would have them damned. ‘Is not this a brand plucked from the fire?’ The reason we are not totally extinct is the Father’s mercy: he is gentle, longsuffering and merciful to us. He knows we are sick, weak and subject to slips, stumbles and falls. His heart is towards us and he carefully measures affliction lest we sink. He does not pay in measure of our offence or we could not stand. He spins out his patience to the utmost length. He will count our little as much. He will excuse the souls of his people, and lay the fault upon their flesh. Christ our advocate stands as friend, and pleads for us as he does. Christ pleads the infirmity of his people against Satan for our advantage. Are we not saved from sin by grace? He has given us the Spirit of grace to help us, for we can do nothing good. God has put the righteousness of Christ upon us to cover our nakedness. We have no merit of our own. God allows us to ride in the bosom of Christ to the grave, and from there, in the bosom of angels to heaven. His Son is our head, priest, advocate, savior, and captain. God’s foresight of our weakness kindles his heart of compassion to us, and puts him to devising things for our relief. I have seen men provide for their children that have been most infirm and helpless. So our Advocate gathers His lambs in his arms and carries them in his bosom. I know the tears that stand in a parent’s eyes as he searches to the bottom of his purse to find out what he may do for his sick child. Christ pleads for us in our infirmities against the devil. And the Almighty yearns for us and wraps us up in his compassions. When God reveals all things to us, we will see how many times he pleaded for us and redeemed us by his pleading.”

John Bunyan