Sunday Meditation – Full Obedience

Sunday Meditation – Full Obedience

“Avoid tempting and deceiving objects, which entice your hearts away from obedience. Avoid company or worldly business that drowns out the voice of God’s commands. If God calls you into a life of great temptations, he may bring you safely through, but if you rush in wilfully you may soon find it difficult to resist. . . . Constant temptation hinders the habit of obedience, and diminishes our hatred of sin and holy resolution. In this way, by slow unnoticeable degrees, we yield to commit the act. The mind that desires full obedience must avoid such distracting company or business. Removing the fuel puts out the fire.”

Richard Baxter

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Sunday Meditation – God’s Presence

Sunday Meditation – God’s Presence

“To increase your obedience to the Lord, keep your eye upon His greatness and continual presence and providence. This will keep you in an obedient frame of mind. So great a God cannot be disobeyed without great iniquity and guilt. A God that is continually with you must be continually regarded. . . . Christ is your guide to bring you safely home. Sin is a rejecting of his help and your happiness. God does not rule you as a tyrant to your hurt or ruin. His laws are for your good and safety.”

Richard Baxter

Sunday Meditation – Infinite Fullness in Jesus Christ

Sunday Meditation – Infinite Fullness in Jesus Christ

“We can see in affliction that the world is not what it seems, not what it promises, and not what we expected and flattered ourselves with. Whatever a man makes his riches, whether friend, wealth, or earthly interests, they cannot deliver out of the hands of death and judgment (Prov. 11:4). The soul finds by experience the unsuitableness and dissatisfaction in all these things. There is no comparison between an invisible soul and visible comforts; an immortal soul and perishing contentments; a spiritual being and an earthly portion. The air we breathe will as soon fill a hungry belly as creature-comforts will satisfy the spirit. In the hour of trial the soul says, ‘Miserable comforters you all are, you physicians of no value’ (Mark 5:26). Ah, but there is infinite fullness in Jesus Christ. He is suited to all the needs of poor undone sinners. No king was anointed with such power; no prophet with such wisdom; no priest with such grace, for God gave him the Spirit without measure (John 3:34), and of his fullness we receive grace for grace.”

Thomas Case

Sunday Meditation – Give Me Christ

“If we fill ourselves with the world, the less we will delight in Christ. This is our sin and our folly. But when God spreads sackcloth on the earthly, we discover the beauty of Christ and can taste His sweetness. He infinitely transcends all the beauty and glory of the world. He is our King to govern; our Prophet to teach; our Priest to save. How precious! Give me Christ, or else I die!”

Thomas Case

Sunday Meditation – Christ Triumphant

“To the eye of reason the cross is the centre of sorrow and the lowest depth of shame. Jesus dies a malefactor’s death. He hangs upon the gibbet of a felon and pours out his blood upon the common mount of doom with thieves for his companions. In the midst of mockery, and jest, and scorn, and ribaldry, and blasphemy, he gives up the ghost. Earth rejects him and lifts him from her surface, and heaven affords him no light, but darkens the mid-day sun in the hour of his extremity. Deeper in woe the Saviour dived, imagination cannot descend. A blacker calumny than was cast on him satanic malice could not invent. He hid not his face from shame and spitting; and what shame and spitting it was! To the world the cross must ever be the emblem of shame: to the Jew a stumbling-block, and to the Greek foolishness. How different however is the view which presents itself to the eye of faith. Faith knows no shame in the cross, except the shame of those who nailed the Saviour there; it sees no ground for scorn, but it hurls indignant scorn at sin, the enemy which pierced the Lord. Faith sees woe, indeed, but from this woe it marks a fount of mercy springing. It is true it mourns a dying Saviour, but it beholds him bringing life and immortality to light at the very moment when his soul was eclipsed in the shadow of death. Faith regards the cross, not as the emblem of shame, but as the token of glory. The sons of Belial lay the cross in the dust, but the Christian makes a constellation of it, and sees it glittering in the seventh heaven. Man spits upon it, but believers, having angels for their companions, bow down and worship him who ever liveth though once he was crucified. My brethren, our text presents us with a portion of the view which faith is certain to discover when its eyes are anointed with the eye-salve of the Spirit. It tells us that the cross was Jesus Christ’s field of triumph. There he fought, and there he conquered, too. As a victor on the cross he divided the spoil. Nay, more than this; in our text the cross is spoken of as being Christ’s triumphal chariot in which he rode when he led captivity captive, and received gifts for men. . . . For as he had previously compared the cross to a signal trophy or show of triumph, in which Christ led about his enemies, so he now also compares it to a triumphal car in which he showed himself in great magnificence. For there is no tribunal so magnificent, no throne so stately, no show of triumph so distinguised, no chariot so elevated, as is the gibbet on which Christ has subdued death and the devil, the prince of death; nay, more, has utterly trodden them under his feet.”

Charles Spurgeon

Sunday Meditation – The Great Evil of Sin

“Sin is always very sinful, but in our prosperity we are not so aware of it. The dust of the world fills our eyes that we cannot see it clearly. God frequently uses affliction to teach his children the great evil that is in sin. It shows sin as an evil in itself. It not only brings evil, but is evil. It not only works bitterness, it is bitterness. It has a bitter root as well as a bitter fruit. God leads the sinner by affliction to take notice not only of what sin does, but what it is. . . . Sooner or later the soul sees sin as a greater evil than affliction, and forgetting its affliction, it begins to mourn only for the sin.”

Thomas Case

Sunday Meditation – the Power of God’s Wrath

“Heaven and salvation is not surely more promised to the godly than hell and damnation is threatened to, and shall be executed on, the wicked. When once a man is damned, he may bid adieu to all pleasures. Oh! who knows the power of God’s wrath? none but damned ones. Sinners’ company are the devil and his angels, tormented in everlasting fire with a curse. Hell would be a kind of paradise if it were not worse than the worst of this world. As different as grief is from joy, as torment from rest, as terror from peace; so different is the state of sinners from that of saints in the world to come.”

John Bunyan